Archives for March 2009
Over at Tor.com, I talk about one of the great movies of our time: Hackers. By all means, head over there to read the column, in which I tried to keep it together. Because below this cut, I just nerd out ridiculously. Hackers: when cargo pants were king. There is no good and bad. There is only fun and boring.… Read more »
Hackers: Back to the Future
Today’s world speeds ahead faster than anyone can keep track. No sooner does Facebook oust MySpace when Twitter swoops in to dethrone them both; paperbacks are threatened by the Kindle, and CD players are obsolete. In this swiftly changing culture, sometimes it’s nice to revisit a simpler era, when camouflage was edgy and passwords were letters—only: the world of 1995’s Hackers. One of the most rewarding guilty pleasure movies of all time, Hackers explores the life of a handful of cooler-than-thou tech savants who find themselves framed for a virus… Read more »

Recent Work

My award-eligible work in 2014

2014 Recommended Reading List includes:
The Girls at the Kingfisher Club (novel)
Dream Houses (novella)
"The Insects of Love" (novelette)
"Aberration" in short story.

Sleepy Hollow Season 2 recaps: "Spellcaster"

TV recaps: Babylon, "Hackney Wick"

Genevieve on Tumblr

  • photo from Tumblr

    robertogreco:

    Halcyon Maps on “Constellations throughout the ages”:

    Though on the short timescale, stars appear to mantain nearly fixed positions in relation to each other, long-term observations show that all stars indeed move and all constellations gradually change over time.
    This chart shows how the various constellations and asterisms on the night sky(namely the Big Dipper, Orion, Crux, Leo, Cassiopea and Lyra) changed throughout the human history and how will they look to an earth-based observer in the distant future, due to the proper motion of stars in our galaxy.

    (via Aaron Stewart-Ahn)

    03/26/15

2015 Appearances

Often updated. Please check back!

March: ICFA (Orlando, FL)