Archives for November 2009
My review of New Moon is up at Tor.com. I’ll have more to say about this movie, later. (Oh, do I EVER have more to say about this movie.) But for now, read and know that, as you read this, this movie is screening to sold-out theatres across the land. Just…think about it.… Read more »
So, The Prisoner remake happened on Sunday. And apparently it’s still happening? I fell asleep, so I don’t really know, but I wrote it up at Tor.com, with the headline, “I am not a number! I am a free bland!”, which should pretty much give you an idea of what you’re in for. And now, an open letter to Ian McKellen! Dear Ian, I know none of this is your fault. I chose a production still where you look grumpy, specifically to highlight how much this is not your fault.… Read more »
So, “Advection” and “Bespoke” both made the Nebula Suggested Reading List. That is amazing, and it is awesome. If you’re an interested SFWA member (or would just like to check them out!), “Advection” can be read at Clarkesworld, and “Bespoke” can be read at Strange Horizons.… Read more »
1. I suspect this is what all period films look like to my sister. 2. The 1:36 mark is for every English major who ever took an Austen course.… Read more »
This weekend, AMC premiered its remake of the cult-classic sci-fi show The Prisoner. This incarnation was advertised as a bold new direction for the series, which follows a government agent trying to escape from a mysterious tormentor in an isolated village too good to be true. Word to the wise: if you try to take this cult classic in a new direction, you might want to make sure you don’t take the Dark City exit through Pleasantville on your way to M. Night’s The Village, or else you risk coming… Read more »
I’m putting discretion aside and just going for this, because it seems like a good day to mention some short stories I’ve written that are eligible for the Nebula this year. Advection. A girl, a plant, a young man, Panama. Bespoke. Fine clothes for the self-satisfied time-traveler in your life. Carthago Delenda Est. You know how your signature is never exactly the same? It’s like that, with people. The Red Shoes. Tango: world’s creepiest dance. (A full list of my published fiction is available here; most of it was published… Read more »

Genevieve on Tumblr

  • photo from Tumblr

    How do you know?

    As predicted, Queen Catherine began her “I Will Ruin You Sexually” Tour pretty much the moment Henry was in the ground. What a magnificent time.

    10/31/14

  • photo from Tumblr

    I loved the Met’s Death Becomes Her exhibition of mourning clothes. The rules of mourning are fascinating and infuriating in equal measure, and the exhibit does a great job of presenting the benefits of mourning (publicly noting grief explains much to others that one then doesn’t have to explain oneself), the business of mourning (fashion crept into mourning left right and center), and the politics of mourning (sexually-experienced ladies who might have money and be in the market for a new husband? Lock up your sons). 

    [Top photo: Metropolitan Museum. Other photos mine.]

    "The Scots shut themselves up in total darkness,wear veils, i know not how many folds, but so black that sitting beside them you could not tell whether it is a broomstick dressed up or what it is." - Elizabeth Emma Stuart, 1856

    "Black is becoming; and young widows, fair, plump, and smiling, with their roguish eyes sparkling under their black veils are very seducing." - Robert De Valcourt, The Illustrated Manners Book, 1855

    "I remember a remark a very superficial minded young lady made to me the other day: ‘I think a long black dress and a long black veil look so nice.’ Poor creature let her think on. She was in mourning once for her father." Nannie Haskins Williams, 1863

    "Have been all this week in a sad task making up my mourning for my dear Papa & today for the first time put it on. The sight of this black dress brings the cause why I wear it more fully to my mind, if possible brings him more vividly before me." Catherine Anne Edmonston, 1861

    "Black is more than ever the favorite color of fashion. there was a time—our mothers will remember it—when the sole fact of wearing a black dress when one was not in mourning was sufficient to call forth a kind of reprobation, and to cause the wearer to be classed among the dangerously eccentric women."  Harper’s Bazaar, 1879

    10/30/14