Archives for June 2010
This weekend, I saw Prince of Persia: the Sands of Time. It was exactly as good as people have said, which means it was a complete wreck. The saddest thing is, even if you get over the whitewashed casting, and the nonsense plot, and the laborious action scenes (save the first big one during the city raid, which was genuinely exciting), there’s still nothing there. It’s all so calculated and flat and recycled. The other saddest thing is watching this cast try to sell what they had to know was… Read more »
Prince of Persia: The Blands of Time
The line between action movies and video games is getting thinner. In theory, this isn’t a bad thing; games have increasingly rich world-building and character development, and action movies are combining choreography and CGI to compete with the physically-impossible feats of their avatar muses. In reality, when a game is made into a movie, it generally falls into the trap of attempting to recreate game play instead of bringing the world and the characters to life in a compelling or coherent narrative. It’s easy to say that this issue is… Read more »

Recent Work

My award-eligible work in 2014

Sleepy Hollow Season 2 recaps: "Paradise Lost"

Column: "Oh, the Cleverness of Me!: Masculinity and the Horror Show, Strange Horizons

Book Review: A Treasury of Wintertime Tales at LA Review of Books

THE GIRLS AT THE KINGFISHER CLUB is named a BEST OF THE YEAR: Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, NPR.org

Essay: "Vulturism," Interfictions

Genevieve on Tumblr


  • archiemcphee:

    Today the Department of Awesome Natural Phenomena is marveling at this marvelous video of a murmuration of starlings flying in tight, yet constantly changing formation that looks like an undulating black cloud. This stunning footage was shot by Alpaca Media last year in the city of Utrecht in the central Netherlands.

    This amazing behavior has long been considered very mysterious, but thanks to the advent of just the right tools - such as high-powered video analysis and computational modeling - scientists are finally making progress figuring out how and why these birds are able to fly in patterns like this.

    And when these [tools] were finally applied to starlings, they revealed patterns known less from biology than cutting-edge physics.

    Starling flocks, it turns out, are best described with equations of “critical transitions” — systems that are poised to tip, to be almost instantly and completely transformed, like metals becoming magnetized or liquid turning to gas. Each starling in a flock is connected to every other. When a flock turns in unison, it’s aphase transition.

    At the individual level, the rules guiding this are relatively simple. When a neighbor moves, so do you. Depending on the flock’s size and speed and its members’ flight physiologies, the large-scale pattern changes. What’s complicated, or at least unknown, is how criticality is created and maintained.

    Click here to learn more about how starlings are able to fly in vast flocks that look like that could just as easily be schools of fish in the sea.

    [via Twisted Sifter and Wired]


    01/27/15

2015 Appearances

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March: ICFA (Orlando, FL)