Glad Rags!

I don’t even know how to start with how excited I am to be announcing this. Let’s cut to the chase.

From today’s Publisher’s Lunch:

Nebula Award nominee and Crawford Award winner Genevieve Valentine’s GLAD RAGS, a reimagining of the Twelve Dancing Princesses as flappers, set amidst the splendor and beautiful chaos of the roaring twenties in Manhattan, to Atria, in a pre-empt, for publication in 2014.

The logline is true; Glad Rags is a mainstream historical about sisters, speakeasies, shenanigans, and shoes. FLAPPERS FOR EVERYBODY.


Technically nobody here is flapping hard enough to convey my feelings, but I love this picture so much that it can stay.

There will be more news as things develop; immediate thanks are due to my agent Joe Monti, and to the circle of friends who were instrumental throughout the writing of it. I am beyond excited to be working with Atria, beyond excited at how many flapper dresses I get to talk about between now and 2014, and beyond excited to bring you a book I dearly love.

In the meantime, everybody start studying their dance diagrams, we’ll need these later.

  • Livia Llewellyn

    Congrats!!!!

  • Alaya

    Oh my god, this is so exciting! The Twelve Dancing Princesses being my favorite fairy tale ever, and the twenties and New York being, obviously, something else I rather enjoy ;) Congratulations!

Recent Work

My award-eligible work in 2014

2014 Recommended Reading List includes:
The Girls at the Kingfisher Club (novel)
Dream Houses (novella)
"The Insects of Love" (novelette)
"Aberration" in short story.

Sleepy Hollow Season 2 recaps: "Spellcaster"

TV recaps: Babylon, "Hackney Wick"

Genevieve on Tumblr

  • photo from Tumblr

    robertogreco:

    Halcyon Maps on “Constellations throughout the ages”:

    Though on the short timescale, stars appear to mantain nearly fixed positions in relation to each other, long-term observations show that all stars indeed move and all constellations gradually change over time.
    This chart shows how the various constellations and asterisms on the night sky(namely the Big Dipper, Orion, Crux, Leo, Cassiopea and Lyra) changed throughout the human history and how will they look to an earth-based observer in the distant future, due to the proper motion of stars in our galaxy.

    (via Aaron Stewart-Ahn)

    03/26/15

2015 Appearances

Often updated. Please check back!

March: ICFA (Orlando, FL)