Archives for December 2013
This Year.
This year, I walked away from my day job. It might be the wildest thing I’ve ever done (I’m very boring). It’s hard to overestimate the level of caution with which I approach life. I’m the gunslinger seat, the flosser, flat shoes, better not. A day job was a given; writing was the thing you supported with the thing you did ten, twelve, sixteen hours a day. But as it turns out, if you sleep three or four hours a night for a decade or so, eventually a doctor will… Read more »
Epics and "Insects"
It’s indicative of how this year has gone that I haven’t had a chance to put my end of year post up yet. I will! Hopefully before the end of this year. (Hopefully.) In the meantime, two updates: Not at all inspired by seeing The Hobbit: Now Only 15% Hobbit, I wrote a piece for io9 about what happens when everything is epic. Obviously fantasy will always have room for epics, and epics can make great stories, but not every story makes a good epic. Unfortunately, Hollywood won’t consider until… Read more »
The Observable Universe, and other stuff
As we careen toward the end of the year, I’m buried in a project and everything else has vanished into the wordcount haze; I appreciate Reign and Sleepy Hollow going on hiatus to allow me this break, but it also means I’ve fallen off keeping this blog up to date whatsoever. So instead, a quick roundup: At io9, I wrote up Dark Universe, a fantastically impressive planetarium show that put you in the middle of the observable universe (literally), explained what was happening, and then talked about a ton of… Read more »
Two Pictures of the Disney Store
I took two pictures of the Marvel section of the Disney Store in Times Square, a year or so ago. They’ve been on my phone since, for reasons. The boys’ section: * In an interview with Kevin Smith, TV producer and writer Paul Dini mentioned things that DC types and network execs had told him about representation of girls: DINI: “They’re all for boys ‘we do not want the girls’,… Read more »
Reign Report: "Fated"
Well, all THAT happened, didn’t it? For all the nonsense surrounding this show, it’s oddly watchable. A cross between a pagan LARP and a bodice-thumping high school play, it contains within it the seeds of true cheeseball greatness, and has carried that promise through the first season, through wandering subplots, some surprising acting, stretch lace bodices, thematic slow burns, and some of the most leaden dialogue to cross the airwaves since the last CW show you watched. This week, it all came together, in an episode that had three hours… Read more »
The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
Today, the second installment of the Hobbit trilogy is out. My official review is in the Philadelphia Weekly; in it, I call this entire franchise butter scraped over too much bread, because at this point I’m not sure what else you can call it. (There are some spoilers in that review, and there will be some spoilers here, too.) By now, the obvious franchise grab of spreading one movies’ worth of material over three movies is beginning to bite the films in the ass; the first movie, while interminably padded,… Read more »

Recent Work

TV Recaps: Elementary, Season 5

TV Recaps: Victoria, Season 1

TV Recaps: Reign, Season 4

TV Recap: Bates Motel, "Hidden"

Fiction: "Everyone from Themis Sends Letters Home", Clarkesworld

Film: How many movies about grief this year? All of them, Legacy.com

Book Review: HIGH NOON: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic, NPR.org

Book Review: How to Read a Dress, NPR.org

Nonfiction: A Doom of One's Own, Clarkesworld

Genevieve on Tumblr

  • Whether you will, or no

    I wrote a piece for VICE about consent as fantasy element in the 18th-century “Beauty and the Beast,” and a little about what happens to the shape of the tale when a retelling (say, I dunno, Disney) alters those elements: “How Disney’s ‘Beauty and the Beast’ Became the Darkest Tale of All.“

    An excerpt:

    The most powerful force in Beauty and the Beast isn’t magic, or even love, but consent. Most retellings of Villeneuve’s version are careful to keep it. The Beast is clear that Beauty must know what she’s getting into. (In Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch’s 1910 version, it’s still more explicit: The Beast warns Beauty’s father to “be honest with your daughter. Describe me to her just as I am. Let her be free to choose whether she will come or no…”) Later, the Beast asks Beauty herself if she comes willingly. And that first dinner is marked by the Beast’s deference to her wishes. Beauty’s earliest surprise is how much power she wields. Even in his nightly request that Beauty marry him, he defers. Andrew Lang emphasized the power dynamics in 1889’s Blue Fairy Book:

    “Oh! What shall I say?” cried Beauty, for she was afraid to make the Beast angry by refusing.
    “Say 'yes’ or 'no’ without fear,” he replied.
    “Oh! No, Beast,” said Beauty hastily
    “Since you will not, good-night, Beauty,” he said.
    And she answered, “Good-night, Beast,” very glad to find that her refusal had not provoked him.

    Lang was one of many who used marriage proposals for the nightly request (Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont’s 1756 retelling was the first), but Villeneuve was under no illusions about the story’s undertones. In her original, Beast asks Beauty to sleep with him. Beauty’s power is the ability to withhold sexual consent.

    [Full article]

    03/20/17

2016 Appearances

Emerald City Comicon
April 7-10, 2016
Seattle, WA

Kent State Wonder Woman Symposium
September 23-24, 2016
Cleveland, OH

New York Comic Con
October 5-9, 2016
New York City

World Fantasy Convention
October 28-30
Columbus, OH