Archives for September 2014
Stuff I've Badmouthed Recently: Stalker & Co.
Because I could not ignore this show no matter how much we all wanted to, I have reviewed STALKER at The AV Club. I don’t know if the title is intended to be in allcaps all the time, but it suits the tone of the show, so we’ll leave it. It is pretty much exactly what you would expect, except with more explicit discussion of why a man’s justified in staring at a woman’s chest, which was certainly an unexpected B-plot for a pilot, but there we have it. (This… Read more »
Sleepy Hollow: "This is War"
X-Files Lite classic nonsense plot machine Sleepy Hollow came back last night! Group hug. (This is the version of Ichabod that Moloch generated in Purgatory to confuse her and trick her into staying forever; he liked hugging her as much as the other Ichabod likes hugging her. It’s just that kind of show.) My io9 recaps have, accordingly, also come back. I was barely able to keep up with all the shenanigans this week, because while they thought the Purgatory fake-out in the cold open was awesome, it also wasted… Read more »
Boardwalk Empire and the Fall TV Return-ening
Opening titles, from Art of the Title This weekend is the last before the rush of fall shows. Let’s all breathe it in for a second. Monday, Sleepy Hollow returns to us, and I’ll be recapping them at io9 with screencaps at the ready! For those who want to catch up, the recaps for season one are right here, complete with a truly embarrassing number of screencaps of their height difference, their priceless reaction shots, and the many dozens of creepy locations that are apparently just sitting around in Sleepy… Read more »
Capclave and Dream Houses
A couple of announcements! First, if I have not announced it already: I’ll be a Guest of Honor at Capclave this October, alongside Holly Black and Paolo Bacigalupi! The convention is the weekend of October 10. When not heckling Holly from the audience of whatever panels she’s doing, I hope to be talking about movies, TV, writing as a day job, and whatever else they decide to ask me and/or I can’t stop talking about. I’ll also have a special project on sale there: my first-ever novella, DREAM HOUSES. It… Read more »
The list of celebrities who had their pictures stolen numbers over seventy-five. Some of them aren’t even capitalized; not names, really. They’re just folders where the prizes go. Jennifer Lawrence is on the list. Perez Hilton posted those, for those who might otherwise have had trouble finding them fast enough. The question went out quick on its heels: Is her career over? * Being a woman with any degree of public life in the age of social media is to be constantly sandblasted; you know the sand was always there,… Read more »

Recent Work

TV Recaps: Elementary, Season 5

TV Recaps: Victoria, Season 1

TV Recaps: Reign, Season 4

TV Recap: Bates Motel, "Hidden"

Fiction: "Everyone from Themis Sends Letters Home", Clarkesworld

Film: How many movies about grief this year? All of them, Legacy.com

Book Review: HIGH NOON: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic, NPR.org

Book Review: How to Read a Dress, NPR.org

Nonfiction: A Doom of One's Own, Clarkesworld

Genevieve on Tumblr

  • Whether you will, or no

    I wrote a piece for VICE about consent as fantasy element in the 18th-century “Beauty and the Beast,” and a little about what happens to the shape of the tale when a retelling (say, I dunno, Disney) alters those elements: “How Disney’s ‘Beauty and the Beast’ Became the Darkest Tale of All.“

    An excerpt:

    The most powerful force in Beauty and the Beast isn’t magic, or even love, but consent. Most retellings of Villeneuve’s version are careful to keep it. The Beast is clear that Beauty must know what she’s getting into. (In Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch’s 1910 version, it’s still more explicit: The Beast warns Beauty’s father to “be honest with your daughter. Describe me to her just as I am. Let her be free to choose whether she will come or no…”) Later, the Beast asks Beauty herself if she comes willingly. And that first dinner is marked by the Beast’s deference to her wishes. Beauty’s earliest surprise is how much power she wields. Even in his nightly request that Beauty marry him, he defers. Andrew Lang emphasized the power dynamics in 1889’s Blue Fairy Book:

    “Oh! What shall I say?” cried Beauty, for she was afraid to make the Beast angry by refusing.
    “Say 'yes’ or 'no’ without fear,” he replied.
    “Oh! No, Beast,” said Beauty hastily
    “Since you will not, good-night, Beauty,” he said.
    And she answered, “Good-night, Beast,” very glad to find that her refusal had not provoked him.

    Lang was one of many who used marriage proposals for the nightly request (Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont’s 1756 retelling was the first), but Villeneuve was under no illusions about the story’s undertones. In her original, Beast asks Beauty to sleep with him. Beauty’s power is the ability to withhold sexual consent.

    [Full article]

    03/20/17

2016 Appearances

Emerald City Comicon
April 7-10, 2016
Seattle, WA

Kent State Wonder Woman Symposium
September 23-24, 2016
Cleveland, OH

New York Comic Con
October 5-9, 2016
New York City

World Fantasy Convention
October 28-30
Columbus, OH