Archives for June 2016
ICON
ICON, the sequel to PERSONA, is officially out in the world! It takes place more or less a year after PERSONA’s assassination attempt on Suyana Sapaki, in which there’s a new, calm, stable status quo…for about five minutes, since the International Assembly is not the kind of crowd you can leave unattended. NPR was very kind (and cracked me up in the middle, for reasons you might guess). And Barnes & Noble was similarly kind: “near-perfect” is the sort of pullquote you dream about. It’s always strange for me to… Read more »
La beauté sans vertu
In April, my short story “La beauté sans vertu” was published at Tor.com. “Rhea, the head of the House, likes the look of her (“Something miserable in the turn of the mouth,” she says with great satisfaction, already sketching). Maria does one season as an exclusive for Centifolia’s fall collection that year, opening a single catwalk in a black robe weighed down with thirteen pounds of embroidery, her feet spearing the floor and her hands curled into fists. After that the press comes calling.” The site’s intro blurb calls the… Read more »
A Few Hours in a Far-Off Age, and Other Books
Sometimes, you read a book and it leaves you with a giant list of other books you have to tackle. Recently, for NPR, I’ve reviewed a string of great books. The Story of Hong Gildong (in a welcome translation), The Other Slavery (a grueling account of enslavement beyond Africa, in particular Native Americans – avoid the comments), Possession (half a dissertation on art collection as political identity, half tattling on Popes, all amazing). The one that gave me the longest reading list was Blockbuster! It’s a literary biography about the… Read more »
Penny Dreadful, and a Blade of Grass
Penny Dreadful, that glorious bastion of subtext-made-text, ended this past weekend, bringing a three-season fascination with Vanessa Ives to a close. The series finale was…a disappointment. I wrote about the problems with this arc in a piece at Salon, so we don’t need to rehash all of it here, but I do want to dig into a few specifics. We’ll start with this picture of The Big Moment, because it gets to the heart of my ambivalence. Is that a stunning, Gothic moment? Hell yes it is, look at that… Read more »

Recent Work

TV Recaps: Elementary, Season 5

TV Recaps: Victoria, Season 1

TV Recaps: Reign, Season 4

TV Recap: Bates Motel, "Hidden"

Fiction: "Everyone from Themis Sends Letters Home", Clarkesworld

Film: How many movies about grief this year? All of them, Legacy.com

Book Review: HIGH NOON: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic, NPR.org

Book Review: How to Read a Dress, NPR.org

Nonfiction: A Doom of One's Own, Clarkesworld

Genevieve on Tumblr

  • Whether you will, or no

    I wrote a piece for VICE about consent as fantasy element in the 18th-century “Beauty and the Beast,” and a little about what happens to the shape of the tale when a retelling (say, I dunno, Disney) alters those elements: “How Disney’s ‘Beauty and the Beast’ Became the Darkest Tale of All.“

    An excerpt:

    The most powerful force in Beauty and the Beast isn’t magic, or even love, but consent. Most retellings of Villeneuve’s version are careful to keep it. The Beast is clear that Beauty must know what she’s getting into. (In Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch’s 1910 version, it’s still more explicit: The Beast warns Beauty’s father to “be honest with your daughter. Describe me to her just as I am. Let her be free to choose whether she will come or no…”) Later, the Beast asks Beauty herself if she comes willingly. And that first dinner is marked by the Beast’s deference to her wishes. Beauty’s earliest surprise is how much power she wields. Even in his nightly request that Beauty marry him, he defers. Andrew Lang emphasized the power dynamics in 1889’s Blue Fairy Book:

    “Oh! What shall I say?” cried Beauty, for she was afraid to make the Beast angry by refusing.
    “Say 'yes’ or 'no’ without fear,” he replied.
    “Oh! No, Beast,” said Beauty hastily
    “Since you will not, good-night, Beauty,” he said.
    And she answered, “Good-night, Beast,” very glad to find that her refusal had not provoked him.

    Lang was one of many who used marriage proposals for the nightly request (Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont’s 1756 retelling was the first), but Villeneuve was under no illusions about the story’s undertones. In her original, Beast asks Beauty to sleep with him. Beauty’s power is the ability to withhold sexual consent.

    [Full article]

    03/20/17

2016 Appearances

Emerald City Comicon
April 7-10, 2016
Seattle, WA

Kent State Wonder Woman Symposium
September 23-24, 2016
Cleveland, OH

New York Comic Con
October 5-9, 2016
New York City

World Fantasy Convention
October 28-30
Columbus, OH