Brooklyn 99: “The Venue”
Brooklyn 99: "The Venue"Boy, this is a fascinating episode to deal so directly with needing to be liked. When Brooklyn Nine-Nine is on its game, it’s one of television’s warmest half-hours. (See the donut-hole cold open that gets an offhand callback halfway through the episode just because.) But after sticking a toe into more serious waters early in the season, “The Venue” seems like a deliberate attempt to bring some lighter screwball energy back into the season.…
Outlander
OutlanderI’ve been recapping the third season of Outlander over at the New York Times! It has been a rollercoaster. This is a show that’s very comfortable with reinventing itself as circumstances dictate. It knows you are probably here for Claire and/or Jamie, and aside from the central tenet of their romance, everything around them is subject to change.…
To Boldly Sew
To Boldly SewSure, that pun is horrifying. But when Popular Mechanics asked me what I would write if I had a whole Star Trek series to play with, I think we all knew that the costumes were going to be high on my list. Good or bad (and boy, Star Trek costumes have been vehemently one or the other, sometimes at the same time), they are a critical part of the wider world of Trek.…
“Familiaris”
"Familiaris"Last year, my story “Familiaris” was published in THE STARLIT WOOD. It’s about fairy tales, motherhood, and how stories get made. This year, “Familiaris” was reprinted in LIGHTSPEED! You can read it here: “I mean, if you don’t want to have one,” he says, that single line down the center of his forehead like his face is about to peel.…
Being Dead Sucks Even More Than You Thought
Being Dead Sucks Even More Than You ThoughtWhen Hugh Hefner died, he was laid to rest in the Westwood Memorial Park cemetery, directly beside Marilyn Monroe. That wasn’t a coincidence: He bought the grave in 1992 for $75,000, bragging to reporters with such satisfaction that it’s a surprise he didn’t try to snag the plot directly above her.…
The Apparitionists
The ApparitionistsOf course, like any good history, The Apparitionists also has a distinct air of the present. We’re reading about a religion so new that many Americans worried it was necromancy, but we’re also reading about a time in which new technologies suddenly upended the way people thought about communication, war upended the way people thought about life and death, and unprecedented access to things — newspapers, tourism, “objective” photograph portraits — upended the way people thought about what was true.…