Category: Writing
Deserts, Dinosaurs, and The New York Times
Wow, am I ever behind on blog stuff! Okay, we’ll start with some essays and reviews. Penny Dreadful will have to wait. First up: Mad Max Fury Road. This sandstorm – which comes from a clear desert out of nowhere to swallow up the sky the moment Furiosa needs it, which looks like the bloom of the sand when her war rig reaches down and the desert rises to put out the fire – was the starting point for my essay at The Dissolve about cinema’s masculine vs. feminine deserts.… Read more »
Dracula's Daughters, Attics, & Anna May Wong
Time for a nonfiction roundup! Recently I wrote my first piece for The Dissolve! Originally titled “Dracula’s Daughters” and then a long post-colon title, because it’s me, the essay examines how the woman vampire became cinematic shorthand for feminism over the last eighty years. This was a camp delight to research, and I really enjoyed writing it. I also enjoyed writing Daughter of the Dragon: Anna May Wong and The Hollywood Problem, but in that way you enjoy tearing a huge gross mess out of your attic. The recent Deadline… Read more »
Pilots, Dolls, Los Angeles, Fairy Tales, Shipping, and Joan: A News Roundup
That is a seriously motley crew of an update, but I’m behind enough on news, so as I dig my way out from under a pile of deadlines, a news roundup it is! (My long fiction update, left over from last week, is that PERSONA is officially out in the world!) * In life/event news, I’ll be at this year’s LA Times Festival of Books! My panel, on Saturday at 4:30, is titled “Bringing the Impossible to Life,” which I honestly hope means Ken Liu, Matthew Reilly, and I will… Read more »
PERSONA
On Tuesday, PERSONA came out! My only excuse for taking this long to announce is that I was finishing the sequel this week, which will probably answer a couple of questions right up front. The cover copy, which we managed to make mostly spoiler-free: Suyana Sapaki is a failure in the International Assembly. She’s not charming on camera, which is crucial for a Face: public image is 90 percent of diplomacy, they tell you right from the beginning. The United Amazonian Rainforest Confederation has been the site of scandal, so… Read more »
Catwoman #39: "Better Than He Does Himself"
Or: the one in which Selina Kyle confirms a rumor. This is an important issue plotwise: It’s the one in which Selina has to decide if she’s going to war against an ever-more-powerful enemy; it’s the one in which she has to sit down in the all-neon diner that Drive forgot and decide if she can even believe she has a brother, much less anything he says. But this is also the issue in which Eiko finally tips her hand about one of the reasons she’s been so drawn to… Read more »
Catwoman and Other News
I have some fun bits of news! We’ll start with the big one. DC announced its June titles today; among them is the note that I will be continuing as the writer of CATWOMAN. It wasn’t a sure thing – I was taken on initially for a single arc, and the future was conditional. It was a big change for her, in terms of both situation and tone, and we all knew it was going to be a leap of faith for readers. As such, I have even more reason… Read more »

Recent Work

TV: Elementary recaps, Reign recaps

TV Recap: Bates Motel cordially invites you to the tragedy of Norma Bates, AV Club

TV Review: And Then There Were None, AV Club

Review: The Story of Hong Gildong, NPR.org

Review: You Could Look It Up, NPR.org

Genevieve on Tumblr

  • photo from Tumblr

    aneacostumes:

    Rococo remodeled

    These Regency garments were made from elder 18th century silks, probably grander Rococo dresses remodeled to fit the new and slimmer style. Whereas the Regency fashion often sported thinner silks and cottons, the 18th century silks were still seen as precious and beautiful, and lucky be the young woman who inherited enough to make a stylish, modern-day dress out of it!

    • Pink gown: 1800-1810, made of a silk brocade from the late 18th century. OK-dep-01040
    • Coat: 1800-1805, made of a Spitafield silk from 1746. OK-05678
    • Blue gown: 1820-25, made of a silk from the mid 18th century. OK-07407

    All garments from The National Museum in Oslo

    04/29/16

2016 Appearances

Often updated. Please check back!

Emerald City Comicon, April 7-10, 2016